Mayo woman leads €50,000 crowdfunding campaign

  • Innovative campaign raises €30,000 in its first week
  • Funds will subsidise training #MoreWomen to run for election

Financial expert Caroline Kirrane is spearheading an innovative crowdfunding campaign which aims to raise €50,000 for Women for Election. Women for Election will use the funds to subsidise training 300 women to stand for election.

The Claremorris-born woman, now adjunct lecturer in Finance at Trinity College Dublin, volunteered to run the innovative campaign after Donald J Trump was elected President of the United States of America last year.

“When I woke up to find Trump had been elected President, despite his controversial attitudes to women, I decided to volunteer with Women for Election to see if I could contribute to improving diversity in politics here.

“My experience in finance and working with startups was enormously useful in co-ordinating this campaign and I’m delighted that I could contribute to Women for Election’s work in this way. We set ourselves an ambitious target of €50,000 for this campaign which is very much an entrepreneurial endeavour run entirely by volunteers.’’

Women for Election’s crowdfunding campaign was launched by Tánaiste Frances Fitzgerald at an event hosted at Twitter’s headquarters in Dublin on Thursday evening, June 15th. It aims to tap in to the goodwill of people countrywide who would like to support women entering politics.

“The response to the campaign has been phenomenal. In the first week we already raised €30,000 thanks to Caroline and her team of enthusiastic volunteers.’’ said Michelle O’Donnell Keating, Chairperson of Women for Election.

Women for Election has a strong track record of providing practical support to inspire, equip and inform women entering politics. Since it was founded in 2012, Women for Election has trained more than 1,000 women to take the next step on their political journeys. Of the 194 women who secured seats in the 2014 local elections, 50 per cent were trained on Women for Election programmes, while in the 2016 General Election, 40 per cent of the newly elected women TDs had been through the programmes.

Kirrane said: “We want to see more gender equality in Irish politics. The recent cabinet reshuffle was disappointing in that regard. But this crowdfunding campaign gives everyone the opportunity to help achieve balance by contributing to the work Women for Election does inspiring and supporting women to take the first step and make a difference in politics.”

Anybody who would like to support the campaign can opt for a number of donation options, offering a range of campaign perks. Full details at www.indiegogo.com/projects/more women.

 

Notes for Editors:

About Caroline Kirrane

Caroline Kirrane is Adjunct Lecturer at the Trinity College Business School and a startup adviser. She has a degree in European Business and French from Dublin City University and a Master of Business Administration (MBA) from Trinity College Dublin. Caroline began her career working in a hedge fund in Paris and returned to Dublin to work with US-based proprietary trading firm Susquehanna. She has also held positions in Dexia and FinTech start-up Eagle Alpha. She has most recently worked as an economist with the Central Bank of Ireland. Caroline made headlines last year after she won first prize in the Travel Meets Big Data hackathon.

About Women for Election

Women for Election is a not-for-profit, non-partisan organisation that aims to inspire, equip and inform women to succeed in politics. The organisation was founded in 2012 by Niamh Gallagher and Michelle O’Donnell Keating. Women for Election provides practical supports for women entering politics. The programmes aim to tackle the Five C’s that hold women back from participating in public life – Confidence, Cash, Childcare, Candidate Selection and Culture. For further information about Women for Election, please see womenforelection.ie.

Follow Us: Twitter:@women4election;

Facebook:@womenforelection;

Instagram: @women4electionire;

Hashtag: #MoreWomen

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